Dream Questing as open table play: it’s been done, right?

I’m going to pitch a campaign idea, and I want people to tell me 1) whether they’ve ever done anything like this before, and 2) how it went. Ok? Here goes:

Heroes adventure through a fantasy world (the usual: fighting evil, slaying monsters, rescuing imprisoned royalty, saving the common folk, overthrowing tyrants, wielding powerful weapons and magic, exploring the wondrous lands around them, making a name for themselves, etc.). But they aren’t firmly tethered to this fantasy world, because in fact they are from the mundane world, without monsters or magic or heroes or wonder. In their home world they are normal people, unimportant, but sometimes when they sleep they appear in the fantasy world and become heroes. And when they wake, they vanish from that fantasy world until their next visit.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Advise me: How should I blog my reviews of D&D Appendix E?

This holiday season, I’m using my free time to read some of the inspirational books and stories from Appendix E in the Dungeons & Dragons 5th edition Players Handbook. This is based on a much earlier list, compiled by Gary Gygax for the original Dungeon Master’s Guide and known throughout the internet as Appendix N. (Admiral.Ironbombs has talked a bit about Appendix N and Appendix E on their own blog, here.)

Since I have a roleplaying blog already, and since this is a roleplaying-adjacent subject, I thought I might blog a little about my impressions of these books. I’m not a prodigious reader, and I’m not much for literary analysis, but perhaps someone will find my thoughts on these tales interesting.

But I’m in a quandary: should I put all my reviews in a single blog post or split them up, perhaps even into separate reviews for each book? A single post would have the benefit of keeping everything in one place, but it would be very long (even though the individual reviews will be quite short). Multiple posts would be more easily digestible, but I suspect harder to find any specific thing you’re interested in (maybe even needing an index post), to the point where they might crowd out the other blog posts on the site. I honestly don’t know which is best.

Dear readers, what would you prefer? One long post, or many short posts?

Bring on the dwelfs: Mixed race options in Dungeons & Dragons 5e

Kiliel from Titansgrave by Nick Gan
Kiliel, Alison Haislip’s half-elf/half-dwarf from Titansgrave. It’s not exactly D&D… because half-elf/half-dwarves don’t exist in D&D. That’s the point.

I recently finished playing in a Dungeons & Dragons (5th edition) campaign, and the same group is now planning for the next one, in the same setting but with all new characters. We’re even using D&D Beyond for it, because if we’re going down that rabbit hole we might as well go all the way, right?

And going through character creation has got me thinking again about fantasy races in D&D, and pondering yet again the age-old question: what in the Nine Hells is up with the Half-Elf and Half-Orc races? What makes them so special that they get treated as distinct races in their own right? Why can’t I play as any other type of hybrid, like a half-elf/half-dwarf dwelf? Well, this time I actually decided to do something about it.

You can play other types of hybrid in D&D 5e. Read on to see how.

Continue reading